Note For Anyone Writing About Me

Guide to Writing About Me

I am an Autistic person,not a person with autism. I am also not Aspergers. The diagnosis isn't even in the DSM anymore, and yes, I agree with the consolidation of all autistic spectrum stuff under one umbrella. I have other issues with the DSM.

I don't like Autism Speaks. I'm Disabled, not differently abled, and I am an Autistic activist. Self-advocate is true, but incomplete.

Citing My Posts

MLA: Hillary, Alyssa. "Post Title." Yes, That Too. Day Month Year of post. Web. Day Month Year of retrieval.

APA: Hillary, A. (Year Month Day of post.) Post Title. [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/post-specific-URL.

Sunday, October 21, 2012

Lupron Notecards

General Trigger Warning
I think that the patent applications and this is enough for the Lupron "cure."

Dr. Mark Geier prescribed Lupron to reduce testosterone, which he says binds to mercury, in an effort to treat autism. He believes that mercury in childhood vaccines is linked to autism, which has been debunked by the CDC on several occasions.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Controversial Autism Doctor Loses License Elsewhere, but Can Still Practice in Missouri, Illinois." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. N.p., 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Mark Geier claims that there are many peer-reviewed studies to support his theory, but all papers linked on his site have either himself or by his son, David, who is not a licensed doctor and did not complete medical school.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Controversial Autism Doctor Loses License Elsewhere, but Can Still Practice in Missouri, Illinois." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. N.p., 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Dr. Steven Rothman notes the complete lack of evidence that Lupron has been helpful for any autistic children and that Lupron should not have been attempted without strict controls and strong evidence that it should work, both of which were lacking in Dr. Geier's work.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Controversial Autism Doctor Loses License Elsewhere, but Can Still Practice in Missouri, Illinois." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. N.p., 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Dr. Mark Geier has had his license suspended or revoked in nine states in the last two years, with active complaints against him in three other states due to this hormone therapy.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Controversial Autism Doctor Loses License Elsewhere, but Can Still Practice in Missouri, Illinois." St. Louis Post-Dispatch. N.p., 04 Oct. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.


Dr. Geier stated in 2011 that he had prescribed Lupron to hundreds of children.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Autism Doctor with Clinic in St. Peters under Scrutiny." STLtoday.com. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 28 July 2011. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

The Maryland board holds that this treatment endangers children, having a "known substantial risk of serious harm" and no evidence to support the effectiveness. The Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics have also criticized his work.

Bernhard, Blythe. "Autism Doctor with Clinic in St. Peters under Scrutiny." STLtoday.com. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 28 July 2011. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.


In six of nine cases reviewed by the Maryland board, Geier gave autistic children an incorrect diagnosis of precocious puberty, sometimes diagnosing children too old for the condition, and then prescribed them with Lupron.

Callahan, Patricia, and Steve Mills. "Board: Drug Therapy for Children with Autism Was Risky." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 04 May 2011. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

In one case, a nine and a half year old (too old for a diagnosis of precocious puberty) was nonetheless diagnosed with this condition, then started on Lupron. Geier also ordered chelation therapy for this boy.

Callahan, Patricia, and Steve Mills. "Board: Drug Therapy for Children with Autism Was Risky." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 04 May 2011. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.


Prescribing Lupron, a drug sometimes used to chemically castrate sex offenders, to autistic children, is based upon the (unsupported) theory that autistic children have too much testosterone, which then interacts with mercury, causing their autism.

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Experts note that giving unsupported treatments the credit for normal developmental leaps is common, and that this is most likely why parents continue believing in these treatments.

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

The program for Lupron that Geiers prescribes is 10 times what it used for early puberty, one of the few approved uses of the drug.

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

The paper which supports the mercury/testosterone/autism link was written by Dr. Geier himself, and experts have called the conclusions baseless and the study deeply flawed. The results that are used to "show" higher testosterone levels do not actually show this, nor do the other results in his paper. Notably absent were tests which could have answered the question of "Are these kids actually having early puberty?"

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Endocrinologists note that Lupron would also cause children to miss the beneficial effects of puberty, such as cardio health in both genders and bone density for the girls.

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Mark Geiers, however, claims that the experts dismissing his work do not know what they are talking about, stating that their lack of experience with autistic children disqualifies them from discussing hormone disorders in autistic children. His son, David, claims that many autism scientists support his work. However, one name he lists, Simon-Baron Cohen, has already stated his disgust at the treatment, suggesting that the claims of support are not as they seem.

Tsouderos, Trine. "Autism Drug Lupron: 'Miracle Drug' Called Junk Science." Chicago Tribune. N.p., 21 May 2009. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.

Geiers are still attempting to patent this treatment, though the application has been reduced from 109 claims to 30, none of which now mention mercury. The remainder of the patent application still has significant reference to mercury, however.

Carey, Matt. "Lupron, Soon to Be a Patented Autism treatment?" Left Brain Right Brain. N.p., 1 June 2012. Web. 17 Oct. 2012

The mercury binding to testosterone which is the main basis for the effectiveness of Lupron for autism was demonstrated in a beaker of heated benzene, not in the human body. We do not currently have evidence that this binding occurs in the human brain.

Carey, Matt. "Lupron, Soon to Be a Patented Autism treatment?" Left Brain Right Brain. N.p., 1 June 2012. Web. 17 Oct. 2012


Dr. Paul Kaplowitz, a pediatric endocrinologist, notes that Dr. Geier works with a significantly looser definition of precocious puberty than the generally accepted one and that there have been many treatments that parents and doctors claimed to work but which controlled trials showed to be no better than a placebo.

Cohn, Meredith. "Lupron Therapy for Autism at Center of Embattled Doctor's Case." Baltimore Sun. N.p., 16 June 2011. Web. 18 Oct. 2012.

One parent remains convinced that Lupron will become the standard for "mercury-induced autism."

Cohn, Meredith. "Lupron Therapy for Autism at Center of Embattled Doctor's Case." Baltimore Sun. N.p., 16 June 2011. Web. 18 Oct. 2012.

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I reserve the right to delete for personal attacks, derailing, dangerous comparisons, bigotry, and generally not wanting my blog to be a platform for certain things. As long as we stay within those ranges, discussion is AWESOME.